September 21, 2015

The IEC Explained (Electrical Safety Matting)

The IEC explained:

The IEC standard offers a class selection system from 1000V to 36,000V for end users to select the correct product to protect them against the possible working voltages they may be exposed to.    

The table below explains the IEC classification system against the maximum working voltages.

Class

AC maximum working voltage

0

1000V

1

7500V

2

17000V

3

26500V

4

36000V

 

For Example, previous users of BS 921 650 volt working, 15kV tested, would choose IEC 61111 class 0 in the new specification.

The previous BS921 650V working classification would come under 1000V maximum working voltage in IEC specification,

You will note that the new specification offers a higher and safer working voltage of 1000V.

For those exposed through risk assessment of exposure to higher voltages, a selection of matting up to class 4 can be taken.

A new feature of the BS EN 6111 is that all classes are colour coded every running metre of the underside, as per table below.

Matting Class

Colour Coding

0

Red

1

White

2

Yellow

3

Green

4

Orange

 

The new specification is more comprehensive in its development and apart from electrical insulation, requires additional material testing for:-

  • Mechanical Puncture Resistance;
  • Oil Resistance;
  • Acid Resistance;
  • Slip Resistance;
  • Flame Retardancy;
  • Ageing;
  • Marking Durability.

 

 

Markings Explained:

The marking on the back of the matting must be durable, visible and must not impair the electrical matting and to conform to the specification it must show the following:-

  • Name, trademark or identification of the manufacturer
  • Suitable for live working; double triangle
  • Number of the relevant IEC standard immediately adjacent to the symbol, (IEC 6111)
  • Month and year of manufacture
  • Category if applicable
  • Class designation.